Karl Barth’s Mozart: Lessons for Christian Music Education

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Karl Barth’s Mozart

  Despite my title, “Karl Barth’s Mozart,” I should say that I am not here directly concerned with Barth or Mozart so much as what I propose are lessons for Christian music education. Specifically, I consider Barth’s thoughtful and emotional engagement with Mozart’s music and argue that Christian music educators are in a special place […]

Beauty in the Word

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This century hosts one of the first generations—according to the late Arnold Toynbee—that does not deliberately teach morality and ethics to children in school. Caldecott’s book provides a past, present, and future view of the importance of educational foundations. In the process of examining what is relevant in an age when educational and relational flourishing […]

Why Do We Teach?

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Most of us who are educators, probably wonder from time to time about why we do what we do, and whether the efforts we make on behalf of our students have any lasting impact. To illustrate, some years ago I attended the twenty-fifth anniversary class reunion of a group of students that I had taught […]

A Reformed Christian Perspective on Education

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Is the purpose of Christian education to isolate or immunize students, to protect them from a secular culture or prepare them for it? Is it better to organize lessons by kind of literature, by history, or by theme? Should Christian schools be governed by the church, or by an association of parents? Can a Christian […]

Teaching and Christian Practices

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This review was previously published in the September 2012 issue of Pro Rege and is reprinted with the permission of the author and Pro Rege. In Teaching and Christian Practices, editors David Smith and James Smith, along with several Christian university professors, wrestle with how faith is integrated into the acts of teaching and learning. […]

Practically Human

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Practically Human

  “Art critics talk about art. Artists talk about where to buy good turpentine.” —George Santayana Reading Practically Human made me want to attend Calvin College. Fortunately for me, I already have; unfortunately for me, Practically Human had not yet been penned when I was there. I spent the entirety of my undergraduate career matriculating […]

Toward a Theology of Special Education

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One of the largest tasks a teacher of special education students in Christian schools has today is that of integrating not only faith and learning, but faith and life for the students in his/her care in ways that promote individual and communal flourishing. Having a solid Christian worldview undergirds that task, but deep reflection on […]